What Participants are Saying about SPDG

“Thank you, very much, for this opportunity. I know that our practices around intervention and behavior have much improved. We have integrated what we learned during our 2.5 years into our regular practice and it is making a difference in student learning. For areas that we have not yet demonstrated as much growth, we know have a way to close gaps. I am appreciative and grateful for this experience.”

Alice Jones, Principal, Woodbury Middle School, RSD #14


“CT SPDG provided excellent training in understanding and implementing PBIS. I see this as the greatest strength of the grant for us. The second most effective aspect of the grant has been the use of the ECI forms to monitor student progress. This has provided a vehicle to focus our interventions and move students forward as evidenced by our data. In addition, the insights into literacy, standards-based IEPs, effectiveness of IEPs over time, and a frank look at the way in which we interact with families and our community all helped us to reflect on our work and day to day actions.”

Lynn Fichtel, Principal, Consolidated School, New Fairfield


“The training and activities puts all of our goals into focus both for a safe school climate and for a rigorous academic offering. It provides the structure and focus on providing an appropriate program for all students and reaches the needs of the whole child, academically, behaviorally, socially, and physically.”

Participating Principal

SRBI

SRBI: Connecticut’s Framework for RtI

All schools in Connecticut have the collective responsibility to ensure that research validated practices are embedded daily in order to achieve these desired goals. The basic principles of a Response to Intervention (RTI) model hold considerable promise for helping Connecticut schools improve education for all students and address the large disparities within the state.

The State Department of Education’s framework for RTI, entitled Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students, builds upon the coherence of various researched-based school improvement models


Connecticut’s Framework for RTI: A Family Guide

Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students

Teachers, administrators, and families want all children to succeed. There are many ways to get children who are struggling to learn the additional help they need to be successful. One way is with the use of “scientific research-based interventions” (SRBI).

This booklet reviews what SRBI are and includes questions you might want to ask your child’s school or program to learn more about how they are using SRBI as a framework to improve teaching and learning. Also included here are ways families can be a part of the decision-making process and what to do when you have concerns about your child’s progress.

Download the Family Guide to RTI (pdf, 494kb)

National Advisory Panel

CT SPDG receives insight from a National Advisory Panel comprised of educational leaders from across the country.

Joyce Epstein

joyce epstein

Dr. Epstein is Director of the Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships (SFCP) and the National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) and Principal Research Scientist and Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. In 1995, she established the NNPS, which provides professional development to enable school, district, and state leaders to develop research-based programs of family and community involvement. Dr. Epstein has written over one hundred publications on family and community involvement. Among recent awards, she was named a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) in 2009 and received the 2009 Elizabeth Cohen Award for Applied Research from AERA’s Sociology of Education Special Interest Group. Her current research focuses on how district and school leadership affects the quality of schools’ programs for family and community involvement and resulting student outcomes.

Steve Goodman

Steve Goodman

Dr. Goodman currently serves as the Co-director of Michigan’s Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSi). Dr. Goodman has served as the Principal Investigator for a model demonstration grant focusing on the implementation of school-wide reading and behavior. He has published articles in the area of school-wide behavior and reading support as well as RtI. Additionally, Dr. Goodman served as a behavioral consultant for special education in the Ottawa Area Intermediate School District. He has been an adjunct professor of psychology and education at Grand Valley State University. Dr. Goodman has extensive training experience on developing effective school-wide systems of interventions and supports.

Janette Klingner

janette klingner

The CT SPDG extends their sympathies to the family, friends, colleagues, research associates, and students of Dr. Klingner who passed away in March 2014. As an admired teacher, lead researcher, and fellow advocate for excellence and equity in education, we will continue to her integral contributions to the field of education.

Dr. Klingner is a Professor of Education specializing in bilingual special education at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She was a bilingual special education teacher for ten years before earning a Ph.D. in reading and learning disabilities from the University of Miami. She is a Co-Principal Investigator for the National Center for Culturally Responsive Education Systems (NCCRESt), a technical assistance center founded to address the disproportionate representation of students of color and English learners in special education. To date, Dr. Klingner has authored or co-authored more than 100 articles, books, and chapters, and presented at numerous national and international conferences, frequently as a keynote speaker. In 2004, she was honored with AERA’s Early Career Award. Currently, Dr. Klingner is a Vice-President for two organizations: the International Academy for Research on Learning Disabilities and the Council for Exceptional Children’s Division for Learning Disabilities. She is the past Co-Editor of the Review of Educational Research, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of Learning Disabilities. Her research interests include reading comprehension instruction for diverse populations and professional development that leads to sustained implementation of validated practices.

Alfred Tatum

alfred tatum

Dr. Tatum is an Associate Professor in the Department of Literacy Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Before joining their faculty, he served as a reading clinic Director, Senior Program Associate for the North Central Regional Education Lab, (NCREL) and Assistant Professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Maryland. He began his career as an eighth-grade teacher, later becoming a reading specialist. Currently, Dr. Tatum serves on the National Advisory Reading Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). He provides professional development support to schools across the nation interested in addressing the literacy needs of students characterized as vulnerable, particularly African-American adolescent males. He has also published in nine journals including Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, Educational Leadership, the Journal of College Reading and Learning, and Principal Leadership. Dr. Tatum’s research interests are the literacy development of African-American adolescent males and teacher professional development in urban middle and high schools.

Partners

Connecticut SPDG partners with the following groups to support the implementation of Connecticut’s SPDG.

Center for Behavioral Education & Research (CBER) was established in the Fall of 2005. CBER, under the Neag School of Education at UConn, is a signature organization that specializes in quality research and teaching in the areas of: PBIS, Behavior Disorders, Literacy, School Psychology, and Special Education. CBER continues to conduct and disseminate rigorous research that improves educational and social outcomes for all children and youth in schools.

Visit the CBER website.

 

The mission of the Birth to Three System is to strengthen the capacity of families to meet the developmental and health-related needs of their infants and toddlers who have delays or disabilities.


Visit the Connecticut Birth to Three System website

 

Connecticut Parent Advocacy Center (CPAC) has been Connecticut’s federally-funded parent training center for over twenty-eight years. The CPAC Director and staff will provide expertise on working with families of students with disabilities and support training and technical assistance to schools on family/community engagement.

Visit the CPAC website.

Connecticut Parent Information and Resource Center (CT PIRC) has been Connecticut’s federally funded parent information and resource center for over thirteen years. CT PIRC staff will lend its expertise on family involvement, particularly the involvement of families of color and families who are culturally and linguistically diverse. CT PIRC staff will support districts through training and coaching on the implementation of school-family-community partnerships/action teams.

Visit the CT PIRC website.

The Connecticut State Department of Education

Visit the Bureau of Special Education’s website.

Visit the Bureau of Accountability and Improvement’s website.

 

Regional Educational Service Centers (RESCs) provide professional development and technical assistance on regional and local levels. Professionals at the RESCs have expertise in Literacy and PBIS.

Visit the RESC Alliance website.

The goal of Office of Special Eduation Program’s (OSEP) funding program is to assist state education agencies and their partners to reform early intervention, educational, and transitional services systems to improve results for children with disabilities.

Visit Signetwork’s website.

The State Education Resource Center (SERC) is a quasi-state agency primarily funded by the Connecticut State Department of Education. SERC provides professional development and information dissemination in the latest research and best practices to educators, service providers, and families throughout the state, as well as job-embedded technical assistance and training within schools, programs, and districts.

Visit SERC’s website.

Former SPDG: PBIS

Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) involves a proactive, comprehensive, and systemic continuum of support designed to provide opportunities to all students, including students with disabilities and second language learners, to achieve social, behavioral, and learning success.  This is accomplished by examining the factors that impact behavior as well as the relationships between environment and behavior.

PBIS is not a program or a curriculum but rather a systems approach to enhance the capacity of schools and districts to adopt and sustain the use of evidence-based practices for all students.  A major advance in school-wide discipline is the emphasis on school-wide systems of support that include proactive strategies for defining, teaching, and supporting appropriate student behaviors to create positive school environments. Instead of using a patchwork of individual behavioral management plans, a continuum of positive behavior support for all students within a school is implemented in areas including the classroom and nonclassroom settings (such as hallways, restrooms). PBIS also works to improve the overall school climate, decrease reactive management, maximize academic achievement for all students, integrate academic and behavioral initiatives, and address the specific needs of students with severe emotional and behavioral concerns (Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, 2008).

 


Connecticut schools and districts are experiencing positive outcomes in response to their initiation and implementation of School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports.  This is evidenced by data collected, analyzed, and submitted via three online data collection and management systems: School-wide Information System (SWIS)PBIS Surveys and PBIS Eval, as well as through the personal testimony of the Principals implementing SWPBIS in their schools.

As one local Principal reports:

“I am a big advocate of the PBIS system.  Through involving staff in the defining, structuring, and implementation of each component of the process, we have had a measurable impact on our referral rate, which dropped 35% in the first year and has remained there in year two.  We plan to keep PBIS in place and continue to refine and extend our efforts.  Every school should go through the process.”

Michael Litke, Principal, O’Brien Elementary School, East Hartford Public Schools


 

Documents and Data Reports

 


Schools that have completed the three-year Training Series through SERC/UConn since 2005:

Ashford

Ashford School

Bethany

Bethany Community School

Bethel

Bethel High School

Bloomfield

Carmen Arace Intermediate School

Bloomfield

Carmen Arace Middle School

Bloomfield

Big Picture High School

Bloomfield

Laurel School

Bloomfield

J.P. Vincent School

Bloomfield

Metacomet School

Bristol

Edgewood School

Bristol

Clara T. O’Connell School

Bristol

South Side School

Bristol

Bristol Eastern High School

Colchester

Jack Jackter Intermediate School

Colchester

Colchester Elementary School

Colchester

William J. Johnston Middle School

Colchester

Bacon Academy

CREC

Great Path Academy

CREC

Public Safety Academy

CREC

Metropolitan Learning Center

Cromwell

Cromwell High School

Cromwell

Woodside Intermediate School

Cromwell, Children’s Home

Children’s Home of Cromwell/The Learning Center

East Hartford

Joseph O. Goodwin School

East Hartford

Governor Wm. Pitkin School

East Hartford

Silver Lane School

East Hartford

Thomas S. O’Connell School

East Hartford

Sunset Ridge School

East Hartford

East Hartford High School

East Hartford

Synergy (Stevens Alternative) High School

East Lyme

East Lyme Middle School

Groton

Claude Chester Elementary School

Groton

Fitch Middle School

Groton

Catherine Kolnaski Magnet School

Hebron

Hebron Elementary School

Hebron

Gilead Hill School

Killingly

Killingly Central School

Killingly

Killingly Memorial School

Killingly

Killingly Intermediate School

Manchester

Bennett Middle School

Manchester

Bowers School

Manchester

Waddell Elementary School

Manchester

Buckley School

Manchester

Illing Middle School

Manchester

Keeney Street School

Manchester

Nathan Hale School

Manchester

Washington School

Manchester

Robertson School

Manchester

Verplanck School

Montville

Leonard J. Tyl Middle School

Montville

Montville High School

Montville

Mohegan Elementary School

Montville

Dr. Charles E. Murphy School

Montville

Oakdale School

New Haven

Betsy Ross Arts Magnet Middle School

New Haven

Ross/Woodward School

New Haven

Katherine Brennan/Clarence Rogers School

New Haven

Troup Magnet Academy of Sciences School

New Milford

Schaghticoke Middle School

Newtown

Newtown High School

Newtown

Reed Intermediate School

Norwich

Teachers’ Memorial Middle School

Norwich

Kelly Middle School

Plainville

Middle School of Plainville

Plainville

Louis Toffolon School

Plainville

Plainville High School

Plainville

Frank T. Wheeler School

Plainville

Linden Street School

Region 01

Housatonic Valley Regional High School

Region 01

North Canaan Elementary School

Region 01

Lee H. Kellogg School

Region 01

Sharon Center School

Region 19

EO Smith High School

Tolland

Tolland Intermediate School

Vernon

Maple Street School

Vernon

Vernon Center Middle School

Vernon

Northeast Elementary School

Vernon

Lake Street School

Waterbury

Tinker School

Waterbury

Crosby High School

Waterbury

Barnard School

Waterbury

Bucks Hill School

Waterbury

Bunker Hill School

Waterbury

Brooklyn Elementary School

Waterbury

Carrington School

Waterbury

H.S. Chase School

Waterbury

Wendell L. Cross School

Waterbury

Driggs School

Waterbury

Sprague School

Waterbury

Washington School

Waterbury

West Side Middle School

Waterbury

Waterbury Arts Magnet School

Waterbury

Margaret M. Generali Elementary School

Waterbury

Gilmartin School

Waterbury

Hopeville School

Waterbury

F.J. Kingsbury School

Waterbury

Maloney Magnet School

Waterbury

Regan School

Waterbury

Rotella Interdistrict Magnet School

Waterbury

Walsh School

Waterbury

Woodrow Wilson School

Waterbury

North End Middle School

Waterbury

Wallace Middle School

Waterbury

John F. Kennedy High School

Waterbury

Enlightenment School

Waterbury

Wilby High School

Waterbury

State Street School

Willington

Hall Memorial School

Windham

Windham Middle School

Windham

Windham High School

Windham

Natchaug School

Windham

North Windham School


Schools that have completed the initial year of training and are currently in the PBIS Training Series:

Ansonia

Ansonia High School

Ansonia

Ansonia Middle School

Bethel

Bethel Middle School

Bristol

Ivy Drive School

Bristol

Mountain View School

Bristol

Chippens Hill Middle School

Bristol

Stafford School

Bristol

Hubbell School

East Haven

Deer Run School

East Haven

D.H. Ferrara School

East Haven

Joseph Melillo Middle School

East Haven

D.C. Moore Elementary School

East Haven

East Haven High School

East Haven

Momauguin Elementary School

Groton

Charles Barnum School

Groton

Mary Morrisson School

Groton

Pleasant Valley School

Groton

Fitch High School

Groton

Northeast Academy Elementary School

Groton

S.B. Butler Elementary School

Hampton

Hampton Elementary School

Manchester

Martin School

New Fairfield

New Fairfield Middle School

New Fairfield

New Fairfield High School

New Haven

Barnard Environmental Magnet School

New Haven

Conte-West Hills School

New Haven

Wexler-Grant School

New Haven

East Rock Magnet School

New Haven

King/Robinson International Baccalaureate School

New Haven

Mauro/Sheridan

New Milford

Sarah Noble Intermediate School

Newtown

Newtown Middle School

Putnam

Putnam High School

Putnam

Putnam Middle School

Putnam

Putnam Elementary School

Redding

John Read Middle School

Redding

Redding Elementary School

Region 01

Kent Center School

Region 01

Salisbury Central School

Region 01

Cornwall Consolidated School

Scotland

Scotland Elementary School

Sherman

Sherman School

Sprague

Sayles School

Tolland

Tolland High School

Tolland

Tolland Middle School

Vernon

Center Road School

Vernon

Rockville High School

Vernon

Skinner Road School

Westbrook

Westbrook Middle School

Former SPDG: Analyzing Literacy Data Teams

Connecticut schools and districts are experiencing positive outcomes in response to their initiation and implementation of literacy programs. This is evidenced by data collected, analyzed, and submitted via LET (Literacy Evaluation Tool), Students common assessment scores pre/post data team cycle including disaggregation of students with disabilities to accelerate their achievement, CMT scores, as well as through the personal testimony of the Principals implementing literacy programs in their schools.

As one local Principal reports:

“Working with SERC has taken our instructional team leaders and our teachers to a much deeper level of understanding surrounding data use, universal assessments, and the SRBI process – especially as it relates to the need for a strong core curriculum. The SERC team truly differentiated instruction – always working with us from our place of understanding.”

Marilyn Oat, Principal, Killingly Memorial School


The Literacy Initiative joins the Connecticut State Department of Education in the commitment to a balanced approach to literacy instruction in order for all students, including students with disabilities and students at-risk, to develop the proficiency, confidence, and fluency in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and thinking needed to meet the literacy demands of the 21st century.

This commitment is realized through continuous collaborative efforts with State Department of Education consultants endeavoring to plan a statewide, comprehensive approach to professional development with regard to literacy.

The Analyzing Literacy Data for Tiers of Instruction project, which helps school-based data teams establish and enhance the systems necessary to inform instruction and raise the literacy achievement of their students. Data teams can achieve these goals by striving to: 1) improve their function; 2) increase the number and percentage of students achieving profi ciency and above on state-, district-, and school-based assessments; and 3) increase the number and percentage of teachers using diff erentiated instruction for students of all races, students with special needs, and students who are English Language Learners, based on the results of the assessment data.

Contacts:

For more information, please contact:

Janet Zarchen, Consultant
(860) 632-1485 ext. 376
zarchen@ctserc.org

Leticia Garcia-Guerra, Education Services Specialist
(860)632-1485 ext. 233
guerra@ctserc.org


Participating schools by year:

2007-2008

Poquonnock School (Windsor), Bowers Elementary (Manchester), Killingly Memorial School (Danielson), Chaplin Elementary (Chaplin), Mary Griswold School (Kensington)

 

2008-2009

Bowers Elementary (Manchester), Killingly Memorial School (Danielson), Chaplin Elementary (Chaplin), Mary Griswold School (Kensington)

 

2009-2010

Bowers Elementary (Manchester), Killingly Memorial School (Danielson), Chaplin Elementary (Chaplin), Highland Park Elementary (Manchester)

 

2010-2011

Bowers Elementary (Manchester), Killingly Memorial School (Danielson), Chaplin Elementary (Chaplin), Highland Park Elementary (Manchester), Killingly Central School (Killingly), Bethany Community School (Bethany), Waddell Elementary School (Manchester)

 

2011-2012 Killingly Central School (Killingly), Bethany Community School (Bethany), Waddell Elementary School (Manchester), Tolland Intermediate School (Tolland), Buckley Elementary School (Manchester), Consolidated School (New Fairfield)

Former SPDG: EIP in the context of SRBI

EIP – Early Intervention Project

In the spring of 2007, SERC, in collaboration with the CSDE, awarded four three-year grants with funds from the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), to assist with the expansion of early intervening services – a school improvement strategy designed to proactively provide appropriate services to students who may be struggling – in Connecticut’s schools. Schools with strong early intervening services provide students with the supports they need to experience success, rather than waiting to address a concern after it has become more significant.

Greene-Hills and Ivy Drive elementary schools in Bristol, Two Rivers Magnet Middle School of CREC, Hamilton Avenue Elementary School in Greenwich and Regan and Wendell Cross elementary schools in Waterbury were selected to serve as “model sites” due to their high level of use of differentiated instruction and early intervention, designed to meet the needs of all students and frequent monitoring of student progress, enabling educators to make informed educational decisions. Through the provision of on-site training and technical assistance, these schools were able to implement effective prevention and early intervention practices that were able to be replicated in several schools in each district.


The purpose of the Early Intervention Project (EIP) is to empower educators to meet the instructional and behavioral needs of students in the classroom, as schools and families come together to form interdependent partnerships focused on student progress. These collaborative partnerships promote collective responsibility for all students, contribute to the development of school-wide learning communities, and foster school-wide implementation of effective instructional practices and early intervening services/response to intervention (RtI), thus reducing inappropriate referrals for special education evaluation and improving student achievement.

For more information, please call or e-mail:

Jared Lancer, Consultant 
(860) 632-1485 x 388
lancer@ctserc.org

Dana Gordon-Gannuscio, Project Assistant
(860) 632-1485 x 231
gordon-gannuscio@ctserc.org


EIP Vision and Beliefs

All schools in Connecticut will have school-wide learning communities in which the conditions for collective responsibility and early intervention are embedded into daily practice in order to improve outcomes for all students.

Components of EIP:

  • Leadership
  • Collegial support and family partnerships
  • Strategic decision-making
  • Assessment and reflective practice
  • Instructional repertoire
  • Accountability and documentation

Belief Statements:

  • District and building-level administrators understand the philosophy and underlying principles of early intervention contributing to the development of school-wide learning communities and a continuum of support that utilizes flexible teaming and partnerships to address all levels of concerns in an immediate manner.
  • Building principals act as instructional leaders and effectively and persistently communicate the vision of early intervention to all staff, parents, and students.  The principal understands and applies the characteristics of effective schools in the management of instructional programs.
  • The school climate is conducive to teaching and learning.  School-family-community partnerships are present and positive; parents understand and support the school’s mission and are given the opportunity to play an important role in helping the school achieve that mission.  There is a climate of high expectations for all students to attain mastery of essential skills and content.  Staff believe that, collectively, they have the capability to help all students achieve mastery.
  • Student academic progress is measured frequently. A variety of assessment procedures are used.  The results of the assessments are used to inform practice and improve individual student performance.  There is evidence of data-based decision-making with an emphasis on the analysis of data to ensure the focus area in need of improvement is clearly defined and the accuracy of the intervention.

EIP Participating Schools

Since 2001, the following districts in Connecticut have had schools participate in EIP. 

(NOTE: this list does not necessarily reflect a school’s current participation.)

Bethel Bloomfield Branford
Chaplin Cheshire Colchester
Danbury Eastford East Haddam
East Hampton East Hartford East Haven
Ellington Greenwich Manchester
Mansfield Meriden Naugatuck
New Haven Newington North Branford
North Haven Plymouth Portland
Region 15 Rocky Hill Seymour
Shelton Southington Stafford
Thomaston Tolland Vernon
Wallingford Waterbury West Haven
Westbrook Wethersfield Windsor
Windsor Locks Bristol Milford